Business South May 2021

38 | TRANSPORT Heavy Haulage Association Oversize transport industry a major player Larger over dimension loads exceed 5m in width and may be up 11m in width and will be accompanied by at least two pilots in the front and one at the rear. HOUSE REMOVALS Buy & Sell New + Used Homes • Building removals • Houselifting, rolling & repositioning • Relevelling & repiling • Basement lifts • Concrete slab relevelling • 4x4 axle hydraulic steering trailers • Latest jacking systems to lift houses to 3m for foundation repairs “The Sign of a Professional” Family owned since 1963 With over 100 years combined experience 0800 800 736 Warren 027 449 7996 Grant 027 432 4043 Email: office@kinghouseremovals.co.nz www.kinghouseremovals.co.nz “If loads cannot get to their destination easily, then much longer detour routes have to be travelled, or in some cases, the items cannot get there at all. So investment in this area is of vital importance in order to keep New Zealand working and improve our productive capacity.” T he role that the oversize transport industry has in building, maintaining and developing New Zealand is key to the operation of this country as a modern evolv- ing economy, says Heavy Haulage Association Chief Executive Jonathan Bhana-Thomson. “The transport of large pre-fabricated items from the place of construction to the often just-in-time needs of the construction and development industries is an important part of the production process. “Other industries that are supported by the oversize transport industry include logging, tourism, electricity generation and extractive along with many other sectors,” he says. The industry is also playing a key role in assisting the country as it grapples with a housing crisis. The delivery of new pre-fabricated houses and the relocation of houses that are being recycled onto new sites are undertaken by members of the oversize transport industry. Jonathan says the current demand for housing at affordable prices is driving lots of interest in these housing options. There are two main types of over dimension loads. Smaller over dimension loads (Category 1, 2 or 3) are between 2.55 and 5 metres in width and frequently travel during daylight hours. Jonathan says that these loads will be accompanied by a single pilot or, if larger, may have up to two additional pilots. Road users should look for flashing amber lights and a sign that says ‘wide load follows’ or ‘long load follows’. “In this case, on sighting the pilot, slow down and look at the first pilot for any indica- tion of the need to pull over,” he says. The second type is larger over dimension loads (Category 4). These loads exceed 5m in width and may be up 11m in width and will be accompanied by at least two pilots in the front and one at the rear. These pilots will have purple and amber flashing lights and frequently travel at night in built up areas. They will display a sign that says ‘danger slow down’ or ‘house follows’. “In this case, on sighting the pilot, slow down and be prepared to pull over and stop. Look at the first pilot for any communication about stopping and parking.” Jonathan says that in some locations infrastructure such as understrength bridges means that all other traffic needs to be stopped to allow an overweight load to cross the bridge at a slow speed. “In this situation, other road users will need to be patient while the traffic is cleared off the bridge, and the heavy load crosses the bridge – often down the centre of the road - so that the load weight can be spread evenly across the bridge structure.” Jonathan says that underinvestment in key structures such as bridges is becoming an increasing problem for the industry and is having a flow on effect regarding the produc- tivity of the economy. “Increasingly we are getting reports from members of the Association where there are more restrictive conditions on bridges, the weight capacity of bridges being limited, individual trip permits are being issued where we used to have long term permits, and some bridges being giving the designation ‘Do Not Cross’ for overweight loads.” As the main industry body for the those involved in the transport of oversize and over- weight loads the Heavy Haulage Association is and is always looking for ways to enhance the system for the safety of all road users. Jonathan says that while the association welcomes the government’s New Zealand Up- grade Programme, which will allocating $5.3 billion in roading upgrades for State Highway networks, it would also like to see investment made in upgrading bridge structures on local council roads. “If loads cannot get to their destination easi- ly, then much longer detour routes have to be travelled, or in some cases, the items cannot get there at all. So investment in this area is of vital importance in order to keep New Zealand working and improve our productive capacity.” T Karen Phelps

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